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Pumpkin patches bring orange invasion to Edmond

The annual pumpkin sales and opening of pumpkin patches have returned.
BY JOHN A. WILLIAMS Published: October 6, 2010
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Whether it's for a jack-o'-lantern, yard decoration or a tasty pie, the search for the perfect pumpkin is in progress.


"At the beginning of the season come the decorators. They get all the pretty pumpkins and gourds for decorating the yard. At the end of the season, about Oct. 20, we'll have nothing on this lot but the jack-o'-lanterns for the carvers," Melissa Shelden said. Her family has operated Shelden's Pumpkin Corner for 25 years at the same lot located at Fifth Street and Broadway.

Her biggest problem so far this year is keeping enough pumpkins on the lot.

"We buy by the truckload and get 48 bins at a time," she said. "We got a truckload on Sept. 15 and were wiped out within a week and a half. We couldn't get our shipments fast enough."

Shelden said there is something about the bright orange color of pumpkins that seems to put people in a pleasant mood.

"It just makes everybody happy. In such hard times people need a happy time. I had a customer come by who said 'when I drive by here I feel such joy,'" Shelden said.

Keeping enough pumpkins on the lot also has been a welcome problem for the annual pumpkin patch sponsored by the Southern Hills Christian Church located at 3207 S Boulevard.

"We received a truckload, about 46,000 pounds on Sept. 19 and another truckload on Oct. 10," said Amzi Gregory, the pumpkin patch's treasurer. "We will have as many as four trucks come through and provide us our pumpkins."

For 15 years the church has sold pumpkins grown on the Navajo Reservation in Farmington, N.M., to support Habitat for Humanity, Central Christian Camp and the church's children and youth programs.

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