Putnam City High School's class of 1963's 'Project Talent' test results are back

Project Talent called for the testing of about 377,000 high school students from geographic areas across the nation. Putnam City High School was one of 1,200 schools to participate and the only school selected in Oklahoma.
by Nasreen Iqbal Modified: November 4, 2013 at 10:00 pm •  Published: November 4, 2013
Advertisement
;

Writer and director David Grubin, who has produced more than 100 documentaries, flew to Oklahoma recently after hearing that Putnam City High School's class of 1963 was sitting on a gold mine of national significance.

The treasure he was after, quite simply, was their story.

Members of the class had witnessed racial segregation, a race to the moon, a missile crisis, a booming economy, a fight for race and gender equality and a deadly war, and they had been chosen for a nationwide study.

“This was a generation that lived through major historical changes,” Grubin said. “Everyone wants to hear the ‘what became of them' stories; that's why high school reunions are so popular. I'd like to look a little deeper and know how what was going on at the time affected who they became as individuals.”

The curiosity that led Grubin to the 50th reunion a week ago was the same curiosity that led members of the American Institutes for Research, backed by the United States Department of Education, to conduct a massive study of American students in 1960.

The study was based on the belief that in 1960, when business was booming and soldiers were fighting abroad, the pending state of the nation could be found not in a board room or in a war zone but in a classroom.

Project Talent called for the testing of about 377,000 high school students from geographic areas across the nation. Putnam City High School was one of 1,200 schools to participate and the only school selected in Oklahoma.

The test was composed of 400 questions that assessed knowledge and cognitive abilities, 150 that assessed personality, 200 questions that captured vocational interests and 394 that collected information about family characteristics, health, college plans, career aspirations and military service.

The result, Project Talent spokeswoman Sabine Horner said, was an unprecedented breadth and depth of information about America's youth.

“There was never a test so huge,” Horner said. “The data that was collected has contributed to studies on health, aging, quality of life and even genetics.”

Horner said participants have been questioned sporadically over the years since they took the test, so researchers could compare data collected then to that collected in the present day.

In 1975, a sample of 500 men and 500 women took part in a quality of life study conducted by Project Talent. The published findings of the study indicated that a lack of adequate vocational and education guidance in high school interfered with the quality of life of the participants later in life.

A study in 2011 by the National Center for Health Statistics National Death Index, in collaboration with Project Talent, found that several personality characteristics identifiable in the 1960 base year data strongly correlate with early mortality.


by Nasreen Iqbal
Reporter
Nasreen Iqbal is a graduate of the Mayborn School of Journalism at the University of North Texas. She writes about news and events that occur within the Oklahoma City Metropolitan area.
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Giraffe Dies After Hitting Head On Highway Bridge
  2. 2
    Scientists reveal secrets of ancient ship found beneath World Trade Center ruins
  3. 3
    This Japanese Island Has More Cats Than People *Squeals*
  4. 4
    Twitter says government data requests growing
  5. 5
    OU announces mobile tickets technology on your smartphone
+ show more