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Q&A about drilling and traffic deaths

Published on NewsOK Modified: May 5, 2014 at 10:34 am •  Published: May 5, 2014
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The nation's oil and natural gas boom has taken an unexpected toll in traffic fatalities in states with intense drilling activity. Some key questions and answers:

Q: What's to blame for the spike in traffic deaths?

A: The sudden influx of trucks used for drilling and other traffic running through communities that have not had time to prepare for it. Many towns and small cities have not been able to upgrade roads or add traffic lights and new enforcement personnel fast enough to keep up with the boom in activity.

Q: How is this different from other economic booms?

A: Fatal accidents almost always rise along with economic activity or a growing population, but this boom has been especially deadly because new drilling techniques require thousands of truck trips for each new well. Trucks and cars make a dangerous mix, safety experts say, because of their different sizes and speeds.

Q: How dangerous have roads become?

A: In North Dakota drilling regions, traffic fatalities increased 350 percent over the past decade, while the population rose 43 percent. In one Texas drilling district, officials calculated that drivers were 2.5 times more likely to die in a fatal crash per mile driven compared with the statewide average. Fatalities in West Virginia's most heavily drilled counties rose 42 percent in 2013, while traffic deaths in the rest of the state declined 8 percent.

Q: Have some drilling areas avoided increased fatalities?

A: Colorado's Weld County approved a record number of drilling permits last year but saw traffic fatalities fall by 23 percent, the lowest level in ten years. The county has been a focus of safety efforts for a decade because of historically high fatality rates, and drilling isn't as concentrated there as it is in some other states.

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