Q&A on Collecting: Sideboard inspired by Charles Eastlake

Anne McCollam answers readers' questions about the value of their antiques.
BY ANNE MCCOLLAM Published: April 15, 2013
Advertisement
;

Q: Enclosed you will find a photo of an oak sideboard. It was made in England and was in my sister's antiques shop. When she closed the shop in 1986, I purchased it for $500. It is in mint condition, and the pulls are the original ones. The top is decorated with carved swans, and both doors have carved urns. Below the mirror is a shelf.

I hope you can provide some information on the vintage and value of my sideboard.

A: You have a good example of an oak sideboard made in the Eastlake period of furniture in the late Victorian Era. It was factory made in England. The style was inspired by Charles Eastlake, the English designer around 1870. He believed the Victorian ornate curvilinear furniture to be excessive and advocated a return to simpler and unadorned designs. His ideas quickly spread to America and factories began producing Eastlake furniture in large quantities. The scrolled top, mirror, shallow carvings, turned pillars on either side supporting the top and the overall design consisting of straight lines (with the exception of the scrolled top) are typical of the Eastlake period. By the early 1900s, the style had faded.

Your sideboard was made around 1890 and would probably fetch $2000 to $3000.

Q: I have enclosed a drawing of the mark seen on a set of china that I inherited from my aunt. Also included with the mark are the words “Castleton China — Dolly Madison — Made in USA.” The set is a service for eight and includes a gravy boat and two platters. The dishes are decorated with a single pink rose in the center, scalloped edges and gold trim. They are all in excellent condition.



Q&A on collecting

Sideboard inspired by Eastlake

Q: Enclosed you will find a photo of an oak sideboard. It was made in England and was in my sister's antiques shop. When she closed the shop in 1986, I purchased it for $500. It is in mint condition, and the pulls are the original ones. The top is decorated with carved swans, and both doors have carved urns. Below the mirror is a shelf. I hope you can provide some information on the vintage and value of my sideboard.

A: You have a good example of an oak sideboard made in the Eastlake period of furniture in the late Victorian Era. It was factory made in England. The style was inspired by Charles Eastlake, the English designer around 1870. He believed the Victorian ornate curvilinear furniture to be excessive and advocated a return to simpler and unadorned designs. His ideas quickly spread to America and factories began producing Eastlake furniture in large quantities. The scrolled top, mirror, shallow carvings, turned pillars on either side supporting the top and the overall design consisting of straight lines (with the exception of the scrolled top) are typical of the Eastlake period. By the early 1900s, the style had faded. Your sideboard was made around 1890 and would probably fetch $2,000 to $3,000.

Q: I have enclosed a drawing of the mark seen on a set of china that I inherited from my aunt. Also included with the mark are the words “Castleton China — Dolly Madison — Made in USA.” The set is a service for eight and includes a gravy boat and two platters. The dishes are decorated with a single pink rose in the center, scalloped edges and gold trim. They are all in excellent condition. I am wondering what this set is worth and how I should go about selling it, if I should chose to.

A: Castleton China Inc. has been located in New Castle, Pa., since 1901. It was taken over in 1951 by Shenango Pottery. Castleton China produced fine china and made dinnerware for the White House during the Eisenhower and Johnson administrations. Shenango Pottery was sold to Anchor Hocking in 1979. “Dolly Madison” is the name of the pattern and was in production from 1952 to 1972. If you decide to sell your set, your options are placing it on eBay or placing an ad in a local paper. If you sell to an antiques dealer, you can expect to receive around half of its value. Your set would probably sell for $200 to $400. If you plan to keep it, insure it for the replacement value of $600 to $900.

Address your questions to Anne McCollam, P. O. Box 247, Notre Dame, IN 46556. Items of a general interest will be answered in this column. Because of the volume of inquiries, she cannot answer individual letters.

CREATORS.COM

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Did Pope Francis really tell a 90-year-old atheist journalist that 1 in 50 priests are pedophiles?
  2. 2
    Facebook and Twitter won the World Cup Final
  3. 3
    Dead body falls out of coroner's van along busy road
  4. 4
    Tracy Morgan: Recovering in style -- first pic since NJ turnpike crash
  5. 5
    Ex-captive Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl could return to active duty Monday
+ show more