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Raw Video: Murdoch Leaves NewsCorp. Headquarters

Associated Press Modified: May 1, 2012 at 6:15 pm •  Published: May 1, 2012
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After a committee of British lawmakers called Rupert Murdoch unfit to run his global media empire, the 81-year-old media mogul walked out of the News Corp. headquarters in New York Tuesday afternoon, making no comment to the media. (May 1)

This video contains ONLY natural sound. No script is available.

TRT: 1:00

SOURCE: AP Television News

RESTRICTIONS: AP Television News CLIENTS ONLY

LANGUAGE: ENGLISH/NAT

DATELINE: May 01, 2012 New York

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide News Corporation New York Headquarters

2. Tight sign

3. Wide walk Rupert Murdoch, CEO News Corp.

4. Tight New York Post newspaper

5. Tight Wall Street Journal newspaper

6. Wide New York Post in a paper box

7. Wide Wall Street Journal

8. Tight New York Post

9. Wide News Corporation sign

STORYLINE:

After a committee of British lawmakers called Rupert Murdoch unfit to run his global media empire, he walked out of the News Corp. headquarters in New York Tuesday afternoon, making no comment to the media.

The finding of Parliament's Culture, Media and Sport committee reflects just how deeply the phone hacking scandal born of Murdoch's defunct News of the World has shaken the relationship between the press and politics.

The divisive ruling Tuesday against Murdoch, his son James and three of their executives also exposed the waning influence of the media tycoon, and could jeopardize his control of a major broadcaster.

News Corp is the parent company of New York based newspapers the Wall Street Journal and the New York Post.

The committee began an inquiry amid disclosures about widespread tabloid hacking of voice mail, concerns over bribes paid to police for scoops, and politicians who may have overstepped the bounds by cozying up to key players in the Murdoch empire.

Tarring the credentials of both the 81-year-old media mogul and James Murdoch, a former executive chairman of News Corp.'s U.K. newspaper division, the committee's scathing words on the Murdochs could affect their controlling stake in British Sky Broadcasting.

The committee said the House of Commons would need to decide on the punishment meted out to the three executives accused of misleading it: Colin Myler, an ex-News of The World editor who now works as editor-in-chief at the New York Daily News; Tom Crone, the British tabloid's longtime lawyer; and Les Hinton, the former executive chairman of News International and the former publisher of The Wall Street Journal.

All three issued statements denying they had misled the committee, or had taken part in any cover-up of phone hacking.

Parliament's power to fine such offenders or send them to jail lapsed in the 18th century _ and a cell underneath Big Ben has long been in disuse. However, offenders can be called to the House of Commons to be publicly admonished, a sanction last used against a non-lawmaker in 1957.

Murdoch has insisted he was unaware that hacking was widespread at the News of The World, blaming staff for keeping him in the dark and failing to inform him about payouts to victims.

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VIDEO SOURCE: AP

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VIDEO RESTRICTIONS: None

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MARKET EMBARGO (S): none

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SCRIPT/WIRE SOURCE: BC-EU--Britain-Phone Hacking, 11th Ld-Writeth

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