Record-setting NM fire spreading in all directions

Associated Press Modified: June 1, 2012 at 1:32 am •  Published: June 1, 2012
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RESERVE, N.M. (AP) — A massive wildfire in the New Mexico wilderness that already is the largest in state history spread in all directions Thursday, and experts say it's likely a preview of things to come as states across the West contend with a dangerous recipe of wind, low humidity and tinder-dry fuels.

The erratic Gila National Forest blaze grew overnight to more than 190,000 acres, or nearly 300 square miles, as it raced across the area's steep, ponderosa pine-covered hills and through its rugged canyons.

The 2-week-old Gila forest fire is the largest wildfire burning in the country.

Gov. Susana Martinez viewed the fire from a New Mexico National Guard helicopter Thursday afternoon and saw the thick smoke among some of the steep canyons that are inaccessible to firefighters.

Along the fire's northern edge, Martinez spotted crews doing burnout operations designed to slow the erratic blaze, which has surpassed the Los Conchas fire as the state's largest ever. That fire charred 156,593 acres last year and threatened the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the nation's premier nuclear facility.

From the air, Martinez pointed to the terrain as being "impossible" in some areas.

"It seems daunting to us because it's now 190,000 acres," she told reporters. "It's going to keep going up. Be prepared for that."

More than 1,200 firefighters are at the massive blaze near the Arizona border. It has has destroyed a dozen cabins and eight outbuildings, fire information officer Iris Estes said.

Experts say persistent drought, climate change and shifts in land use and firefighting strategies mean other western states likely will see similar giant fires this season.

"We've been in a long drought cycle for the last 20 years, and conditions now are great for these type of fires," said Steve Pyne, author of "Tending Fire: Coping with America's Wildland Fires" and a life science professor at Arizona State University. "Everything is in line."

Agencies in New Mexico, Colorado, Arizona are bracing for the worst. Many counties have established emergency telephone and email notification systems to warn of wildfires, and most states have enlisted crews from other jurisdictions to be ready when the big ones come.

"It's highly likely that these fires are going to get so big that states are going to need outside resources to fight them," said Jeremy Sullens, a wildland fire analyst at the National Interagency Fire Center.

According to the National Weather Service, a dry climate is expected to prolong drought conditions across the Great Basin and central Rockies during the fire season. Large portions of Nevada, Arizona, Utah, Colorado and New Mexico will remain under severe drought conditions.

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