Records reveal split on Oklahoma City boulevard designs as comment period is extended

Officials with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation say they plan to use a 23-day extension of a comment period on designs for a downtown boulevard to address confusion and answer lingering questions about the project.
by Steve Lackmeyer Published: May 24, 2014
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Officials with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation say they plan to use a 23-day extension of a comment period on designs for a downtown boulevard to address confusion and answer lingering questions about the project.

Records obtained by The Oklahoman suggest a community divided on the project. The extension is being applauded by Friends for a Better Boulevard, an advocacy group that succeeded in lobbying state and city officials to look at scrapping a previous design that would have resulted in an elevated highway bypass being built between Western and Walker avenues along the old Interstate 40 alignment.

“I like it,” said Bob Kemper, founder of Friends for a Better Boulevard. “The whole thing gives us an open door again. Now we can bring this up to the city council on some issues we have.”

Kemper hopes the city council will vote a preference on boulevard designs presented by the Transportation Department, noting a previous vote two years was for a design presented by a hired consultant, StanTech, and not in response to the designs released by the state agency earlier this month.

“There have been changes made on what was given by StanTech,,” Kemper said. “The city council can now look at the options and make some fresh decisions.”

State transportation officials faced criticism over the previously set two-week comment period, which ended Wednesday and started with an open house hosted by highway engineers at the Cox Convention Center on May 7. Transportation Department officials said the two weeks was in compliance with guidelines set by the Federal Highway Administration, but Friends for a Better Boulevard argued it did not give the public enough time to scrutinize the design options and be fully informed about the project.

Developers and real estate professionals have told The Oklahoman the boulevard’s design can either boost or kill development chances for a large blighted area bordered by the new roadway, Interstate 40, Western and Walker Avenues known as part of Core to Shore.

The area includes a collection of decades-old buildings deemed by developers to be architecturally significant. Kemper said a new concern is the state’s plan to cut off Exchange Avenue between the Stockyards and downtown.

“I don’t think they realize the importance of that street as a connection to Cow Town,” Kemper said. “We have to do something for the people in Stockyards City— that’s a good access road and this would cut them off.”

Kemper’s organization is favoring Option C, the design scored highest by the Transportation Department, but with changes including restoring Exchange Avenue access to downtown and creating a full boulevard extension at Lee Avenue.

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by Steve Lackmeyer
Business Reporter
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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