Region III Soccer Championships draw coaches from all over

Coaches from conferences ranging from the Horizon League to the Big 12 watched players who were already committed to their schools, evaluated players they were interested in recruiting and occasionally marked down younger players to keep an eye on for the future.
BY RHIANNON WALKER Staff Writer rwalker@opubco.com Published: June 26, 2013
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photo - U.S. YOUTH SOCCER REGION III CHAMPIONSHIPS / YOUTH SOCCER TOURNAMENT: 96 Lobos Rush Blue (TN) Chad Riesenbeck, left, and TUSA Gold (NC) Jonathan Giacona during the 2013 Youth Soccer Southern Regional Championship in Edmond, Okla. Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman
U.S. YOUTH SOCCER REGION III CHAMPIONSHIPS / YOUTH SOCCER TOURNAMENT: 96 Lobos Rush Blue (TN) Chad Riesenbeck, left, and TUSA Gold (NC) Jonathan Giacona during the 2013 Youth Soccer Southern Regional Championship in Edmond, Okla. Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman

— Over the last week, 208 soccer teams have participated in the U.S. Youth Region III Championships at the Edmond Soccer Club Complex. An estimated 3,600 players competed for the 14 championships available at the event.

Boys and girls ranging from age 13 to 19 played their best soccer in front of an estimated 12,000 spectators at the Region III Championships. Spectators weren't the only people watching the games, however.

About 200 college coaches were also in attendance. Coaches from conferences ranging from the Horizon League to the Big 12 watched players who were already committed to their schools, evaluated players they were interested in recruiting and occasionally marked down younger players to keep an eye on for the future.

Events like this not only provide increased exposure for the players, but they also show coaches which players perform the best in a highly competitive setting.

“What I really like about regionals is you always get the kids' best effort,” OSU women's assistant coach Karen Hancock said. “They understand they're playing elimination games, they're playing to advance, and playing for a championship and privilege to go on to the national tournament. And because of that, there's a little bit more on the line, and the kids play like there's a little bit more on the line, and I appreciate that as a college coach.”

Hancock has watched kids play at showcases, but said she feels the intensity increases in a tournament format like the regionals.

Hancock has spent the last week observing and evaluating players from different states. Not only did she take note of older players closer to graduating high school, but she also looked at players from younger age groups as well.

“Just get an initial (of) maybe who stands out,” Hancock said. “It's certainly not the end product — kids are still very young at that age and a lot of developing will still occur — but I like to see what is out there, and what is up and coming.”