Rhodes Granary in Norman comes down

The Rhodes Granary, which was in operation for nearly 60 years, was demolished this week. The city now owns the property and will use it as a building site or to expand Andrews Park.
BY JANE GLENN CANNON jcannon@opubco.com Modified: December 14, 2012 at 6:00 pm •  Published: December 15, 2012
Advertisement
;

Longtime mill worker Richard McDonald photographed “step-by-step” the demolition this week of the Rhodes Granary at 602 N Santa Fe Ave.

McDonald worked for the granary from 1967 to 2000 and is married to Sherry Rhodes McDonald, whose father, Cecil, owned the business.

Cecil Rhodes was in the feed-making business for about 60 years, Sherry McDonald said.

“This is bittersweet for the family to watch it come down,” she said.

Cecil Rhodes died about eight years ago, and his family sold the granary property to the city in 2008. The land just north of Abe Andrews Park might be used to expand the park or could serve as a site for a new library or other extension of the city hall complex, officials said.

Rhodes was considered a pioneer in the modernization of the grain business in Oklahoma, his daughter said.

Grain was purchased and imported to the site from around the world, she said.

“What's sad is so few people seemed to know it was even there,” Sherry McDonald said.

The city contracted M&M Wrecking Co. to demolish the granary because it had fallen into disrepair.

“It's a very emotional time for the family,” Sherry McDonald said.

Richard McDonald said he wanted to document the demolition for the family and because the granary was a part of state history.



Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Native American tribe cancels Ted Nugent show, cites 'racist' views
  2. 2
    Body of fugitive billionaire in South Korean ferry case found
  3. 3
    KFOR: One of the dogs left behind 'because they needed to be bathed' has died
  4. 4
    KFOR: Class action lawsuit filed against Norman Regional Hospital
  5. 5
    KOCO: OHP concerned about rise in road rage incidents
+ show more