Rio delivers bikinis in mesh and rigid metal

JENNY BARCHFIELD
The Associated Press
Modified: April 23, 2013 at 5:27 pm •  Published: April 23, 2013
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photo - A model wears a creation from the Triya summer collection during Fashion Rio in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, April 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)
A model wears a creation from the Triya summer collection during Fashion Rio in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Friday, April 19, 2013. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

Triya delivered a rigid metal bandeau top that look like it had been made from a cast of the model's chest. But it was the kaftan printed with a photo from Helmut Newton's "Big Nudes" series that really had the spectators doing a double-take.

Salinas, the well-heeled teens' label of choice, eased off the saccharine and toned down the screaming pinks, delivering an unusually sophisticated collection dominated by black and white polka dots. The theme was "La Dolce Vita," and competing snippets from the soundtracks of classic Italian movies from the 1960s blared over the loudspeakers as the models strutted the polka-dotted catwalk in vertiginous heels. The label blurred the usually well-defined line between one pieces and bikinis, sending out spotted bandeau tops with high-rise granny pants bottoms or itsy-bitsy bottoms with a maxi-top that nearly reached the models' navels. Both looks left only the thinnest strip of exposed skin between top and bottom.

While the swimwear shows are always the highlight of Rio's summer lineup, most of the labels field daywear. Top daywear displays included Oh, Boy!, which fielded a collection of denim shorts and tops so abbreviated and so laden with tassels, studs, rhinestones, patches and other embellishments they hit the sweet spot where tacky becomes fabulous.

Reserva lived up to its reputation as Rio's answer to the intellectual Belgian label Martin Margiela with a performance-influenced show that was heavy on concept, light on actual clothes. The show, among the week's sole menswear displays, saw a parade of hipster-looking male models from whose backs emerged clothes racks, each hung with a costume that dangled a meter (yard) in front of them, as if to suggest the remarkable character they had lurking inside — a pirate, Superman, Fred Flintstone — beneath the unremarkable streetwear.