Rodd Moesel: Tips on picking out Christmas trees

Most of the cut Christmas trees that our found at Oklahoma retailers come from Washington, Oregon or Michigan and are usually different varieties of firs, spruce, pine or cedar.
Published: December 7, 2013
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Thanksgiving and our celebration of the annual harvest are now complete and our attention turns to the monthlong celebration leading up to Christmas. Most are now thinking of Christmas trees, poinsettias, evergreen wreaths, Christmas cactus, Amaryllis and other Christmas traditions.

There are several choices if you want a live Christmas tree for your celebrations. You can go with a live-cut tree, a container-grown or field-dug living tree to plant outside later or a houseplant style tree like a Norfolk Island pine. There are a number of Oklahoma Christmas tree farms where you can select a cedar, pine or fir tree that has already been cut or you can start or maintain a family tradition and select and cut your own fresh Christmas tree.

Most of the cut Christmas trees that our found at Oklahoma retailers come from Washington, Oregon or Michigan and are usually different varieties of firs, spruce, pine or cedar. Cut trees are available in all sizes, densities and shapes depending on the variety, the weather in their lifetime and the level of care and pruning they received during cultivation.

You should make a fresh cut on cut trees and set in a Christmas tree stand that holds adequate fresh water to help keep the tree hydrated. Check the water regularly while in your home, adding more as needed to help prevent needle drop and drying. You can add a polymer gel product to the water to help extend the life of your cut Christmas tree.

Some folks like to bring a living container grown or dug evergreen into the house as their Christmas tree and then plant it out in the yard afterward as a living memory of Christmas celebrations and an addition to their landscape. Since our homes are warm and drying it is best to limit the time you have a true living Christmas tree in the home to 10 to 14 days so that it is not too dry or “soft” when moved outside and planted in the yard after Christmas.

Some folks, especially those in apartments, the hospital, nursing home or other small spaces, like to decorate and celebrate the Christmas holiday with a Norfolk Island pine tree that also makes a good houseplant year round.



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