Romney shakes up the strategy, tones down rhetoric

Associated Press Modified: April 28, 2012 at 7:15 pm •  Published: April 28, 2012
Advertisement
;

WESTERVILLE, Ohio (AP) — Mitt Romney's Etch A Sketch moment is at hand.

Now that he's the presumptive Republican presidential nominee, Romney is shifting away from the "red-meat" issues of abortion and immigration and instead holding more events highlighting his appeal as a regular guy.

The transformation played out Friday when he emerged publicly for the first time in days at a central Ohio university carrying a hamburger and fries in a Styrofoam container.

In a small room that featured more television cameras than students, Romney chatted about economic issues facing young people as he picked through his greasy lunch.

Romney's appearance at Otterbein University wasn't the full strategic shakeup from primary to general election that some Republicans feared, but it offered a glimpse into what aides say will be a shift in tone and focus in the coming weeks as Romney fights to deny President Barack Obama a second term.

He will favor more intimate settings, like the Ohio classroom, and a schedule that calls for fewer public appearances as the campaign hopes to show a softer side of the former Massachusetts governor who struggles at times to connect with average Americans. That's a dramatic difference from Obama, who feeds on large crowds and has scheduled his first formal campaign rallies for May 5.

While the Republican presidential contest has been raging for more than a year, the Romney campaign concedes that most general election voters haven't yet paid close attention. The campaign now sees an opportunity to reintroduce their candidate to the independents and moderate voters — Hispanics and younger voters, among them — who will ultimately help decide November's general election. His focus will shift to Obama's record, his own economic credentials and what aides call "inspirational themes."

"I'm absolutely convinced that this nation is the greatest nation on earth, and it is so because of the American people, a people who stand united when called upon by leaders to be united," Romney said at Otterbein University Friday, offering unusually measured remarks — even for the former businessman's standards — mentioning Obama by name only a handful of times. "I will try and unite the American people, not divide us."

But the stop at Otterbein University highlighted Romney's challenge: His style on the campaign trail is a study in contrasts.

Romney is almost constantly cracking jokes with the people around him — whether they are governors or college students or his staff. He likes practical jokes and fast food, whether cameras are rolling or not. But he is at other times incredibly disciplined, refusing to take impromptu questions from reporters or wade into difficult subjects unprepared.

He often delivers remarks from a teleprompter — an aid he's criticized Obama for using — and he rarely displays emotion in public. Campaigning in Puerto Rico last month, he may have been the only person on a crowded stage not dancing.

Continue reading this story on the...