Ruling could assist U.S. in becoming major oil exporter

By JONATHAN FAHEY and DINA CAPPIELLO, Associated Press Published: June 25, 2014
Advertisement
;

Companies are taking advantage of new ways to export oil from the U.S. despite government restrictions, and in the process helping the U.S. become an ever bigger exporter of petroleum on the world stage.

The Obama Administration has opened the door to more exports — without changing policy — by allowing some light oils to be defined as petroleum products like gasoline or diesel, which are not subject to export restrictions.

Although U.S. production has boomed in recent years, the nation still consumes far more crude oil than it produces and remains heavily dependent on imports. But the crude being produced by U.S. drillers in recent years includes types of oils that don’t have a big market here. This has the oil industry and some politicians calling for an end to crude export restrictions, which were adopted after the 1973 Arab oil embargo.

Economists generally agree that lifting the restrictions would benefit the U.S. economy, but the ban remains a touchy political subject because of the fear — unfounded, most analysts say — that lifting the ban on exports will raise gasoline prices for U.S. drivers or compromise U.S. energy security. Most experts believe the restrictions will not be overturned this year because of the coming midterm elections.

In the meantime, companies have searched for ways to reach overseas buyers. Oil companies are increasingly exporting crude to Canada with special licenses from the Commerce Department. Other types of light oils known by names such as “diluent” and “condensate” are — or will soon be — finding their way overseas.

Continue reading this story on the...