OSU football: Running back Desmond Roland ready for business

The Cowboys kept waiting for Desmond Roland to grow up, and effectively, grow into a running back they could rely on.
by John Helsley Modified: August 8, 2013 at 2:30 pm •  Published: August 7, 2013
Advertisement
;

The Cowboys kept waiting for Desmond Roland to grow up, and effectively, grow into a running back they could rely on.

Roland only now realizes it, but he's been waiting on the same thing.

“Now I know it's not all fun and games,” Roland said. “The coaches are counting on me. There's not a lot of experienced running backs. I just know I have to be ready.”

Oklahoma State has long been a two-back team. Dantrell Savage and Kendall Hunter. Hunter and Keith Toston. Hunter and Joseph Randle. Randle and Jeremy Smith …

Now the Cowboys are looking for their new tandem, with Randle gone to the NFL and Smith moving into the feature role. But do they have a true No. 2, a sidekick fit to help handle the heavy workload created by an OSU hurry-up offense that piles up plays?

Roland says he's ready.

And for the first time, Cowboys coaches say he's ready, too.

“It's time,” said running backs coach Jemal Singleton. “He's not a freshman anymore. He's not a sophomore anymore. He's got two years left to play college football. It's time he shows up.

“And Desmond has really come along. He needed some maturity time and I think that's happened. I think he's ready to play. He wants to play. I think the love of football is really tugging at him, to start doing things that give him that opportunity.”

Cowboys coach Mike Gundy often refers to players who “like to play football.” Yet that liking is not a literal thing, as much as it is multilayered labeling of the player who is willing to do all the right things to thrive.

The player who likes to play football also …

Takes school seriously. Commits to offseason workouts. Avoids off-the-field distractions.

Previously at OSU, Roland didn't “like” to play football enough.

“I've told him this, he wasn't ready to be that guy,” Singleton said. “He hadn't shown, responsibility wise or maturity wise, that we could trust him to do the things we need him to do. Now that's changed.

“There's no ifs, ands or buts about that, with the type of young man that he's become in a lot of different ways. Academically, his GPA has gone through the roof. His tutors are singing his praises. So you can see the maturity change.”

Roland denies none of what Singleton describes, copping to it all, including the growth.

“Coming in my freshman year, I was all over the place,” said Roland, who was the No. 15 prep prospect in Texas in rankings by Scout. “I wasn't fully focused. It's a huge adjustment. Not everybody can come in and adjust that quick. Sometimes it takes a couple of years. It can be a learning experience. There can be some downfalls. You just have to learn how to handle all that. And I feel like I've handled it well.


by John Helsley
OSU Reporter Sr.
John Helsley grew up in Del City, reading all the newspapers and sports magazines he could get his hands on. And Saturday afternoons, when the Major League Game of the Week was on, he'd keep a scorecard for the game. So the sports appeal was was...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Facebook Post Saves Drowning Teen
  2. 2
    Saturday's front page of the New York Times sports section is simple: LeBron James and transactions
  3. 3
    The 19th-century health scare that told women to worry about "bicycle face"
  4. 4
    Sex Valley: Tech's booming prostitution trade
  5. 5
    Colorado Is Consuming Way More Pot Than Anyone Ever Believed
+ show more