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Ruth Marcus: Strengthening our resolve

BY RUTH MARCUS Published: December 21, 2012
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Like so many other people these days, I regain my composure only to see it crumble in an instant. At the piercing sight of a photograph, Daniel Barden with his impish smile and missing front teeth. At the devastating power of a simple sentence, about Charlotte Bacon's Girl Scout troop: “There were 10 girls in the group. Only five are left.”

This national wallowing serves a purpose — not only to grieve but to summon the resolve for change.

There is talk, finally, belatedly, of reinstating the long-lapsed ban on assault weapons. This is an admittedly imperfect, certainly porous solution (existing weapons would remain untouched, look-alike guns would be produced), but a useful step nonetheless.

Even better would be a companion measure, again lapsed with the expiration of the assault weapons ban, to prohibit the manufacture of magazines of more than 10 rounds. It is testament to our fecklessness that these restrictions were not reimposed in the aftermath of Fort Hood, or Tucson, or Aurora.

There are two additional areas we must confront to respond effectively to Newtown: first, the power of money in politics; second, the role of the courts.

Legislative fixes for gun violence are elusive because they are, or appear to be, politically perilous. How else to explain the shameful fact that President Barack Obama, who as a candidate in 2008 said he would work to reinstate the assault weapons ban, had scarcely a word to say in its defense after the previous shootings? That — in his first year in office — the president signed into law more repeals of federal gun policies than in the eight years of George W. Bush?

According to the Center for Responsive Politics, the National Rifle Association and its affiliates spent nearly $20 million during the 2012 campaign. Yet reports of its ability to deliver political death blows may be greatly exaggerated. “This myth that the NRA can destroy political careers is just not true,” New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg said Sunday on NBC's “Meet the Press.”

So let money counter money. Use the forces unleashed by Citizens United for good instead of for evil, a supersized super PAC to thwart the NRA. Call it Sanity PAC.

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