Share “Rx drug bills sent to Oklahoma governor”

Rx drug bills sent to Oklahoma governor

A bill that would prohibit a written or oral prescription containing hydrocodone from being refilled easily passes the Oklahoma House.
BY MICHAEL MCNUTT mmcnutt@opubco.com Modified: May 16, 2013 at 10:46 pm •  Published: May 17, 2013

Two measures intended to help tackle the prescription drug overdose problem in Oklahoma won final legislative approval Thursday and are on their way to the governor.

House Bill 1783 would prohibit a written or oral prescription containing the painkiller hydrocodone from being refilled. There are no refill limits now on the drug.

The House of Representatives voted 75-6 to accept a Senate amendment to HB 1783, which earlier passed 43-0 in the Senate. The original House version of the measure capped refills at two; the Senate amendment eliminated any refills.

“Getting to zero is really where we needed it to be,” said Chuck Lester, who works for Oklahoma State University's prevention programs and was a member of a state group looking at prescription overdose. “It means that there's just going to be more interaction before somebody can just continually go and get refills without necessarily seeing a doctor. They at least have to check in to keep getting that prescription.”

The House also passed HB 1782, which would allow first responders to administer an overdose counteractive medication without a prescription to someone who is showing signs of an overdose under the Good Samaritan Act. It also would allow a family member of someone who has a prescription for hydrocodone or other painkillers to get a prescription for overdose counteractive medication after receiving training on how to administer it when the person showed signs of an overdose; the family member would be covered under the Good Samaritan Act.

Continue reading this story on the...


It means that there's just going to be more interaction before somebody can just continually go and get refills without necessarily seeing a doctor. They at least have to check in to keep getting that prescription.”

Chuck Lester,
Representative of Oklahoma State University's prevention programs and a member of a state group looking at prescription overdose

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Two teachers' refusal to give tests puts their jobs at risk, but they say it's worth it
  2. 2
    Few Oklahoma exonerees receive payment for wrongful convictions
  3. 3
    Tiger Woods hires a new swing coach
  4. 4
    Man convicted of beating grandmother to death while high on PCP
  5. 5
    30,000 missing emails from IRS' Lerner recovered | WashingtonExaminer.com
+ show more