Sandra Bullock remembers New York on 9/11

Actress stars in the Oscar-nominated “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close.”
BY DENNIS KING dking@wimgo.com Published: February 20, 2012
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Editor's note: “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” is nominated for a best picture Academy Award. NewsOK will have live coverage of The Oscars on Sunday evening.

Sandra Bullock remembers exactly where she was on Sept. 11, 2001, when two hijacked jetliners crashed into Lower Manhattan's Twin Towers.

She was at a boutique hotel in Soho. But, being a media-savvy celebrity, she declines to say exactly which hotel, for fear that her revelation would be interpreted as some sort of commercial endorsement.

“But I had full view of both towers,” she said. “I was there, I saw the second plane, I saw people, I saw people helping people. And that for me is what resonates about the city of New York. I saw within a second the entire city come together and help one another in a way they hadn't the day before.”

During press interviews for the Oscar-nominated film “Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close,” hosted by Warner Bros. at the Regency Hotel, Bullock talked about the cathartic nature of acting in a movie that addresses the excruciating aftermath of 9/11 for families of victims.

In the film (her first role since winning the Oscar for “The Blind Side”), Bullock plays Linda Schell, widow of a man killed in the terrorist attack and the mother of a precocious young son who embarks on a painstaking journey around the city to come to terms with his beloved father's senseless death.

Bullock said she believes the film has the potential to help people heal, but she rejects the idea that it will bring about any sense of closure.

“There will never be closure, I think for me or for so many people,” she said. “I have so many memories and emotions of it, some that still don't register I think because your mind doesn't let you register why someone would do that. So in a good way I hope (the memory) doesn't ever leave, that vibrancy of what happened afterward, because it made me aware of so many things I wasn't aware of before. So no closure but as long as everyone can talk about it and grieve I think that's what this story is, the allowance to talk about this thing and be able to grieve.”

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