SandRidge approves director candidates proposed by dissident shareholder

Following a court order, Oklahoma City-based SandRidge Energy Inc. on Tuesday backed off its language about the takeover attempt by dissident shareholder TPG-Axon.
by Adam Wilmoth Modified: March 12, 2013 at 8:56 pm •  Published: March 12, 2013
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SandRidge Energy Inc. said Tuesday it has clarified its position against a takeover attempt by dissident shareholder TPG-Axon, helping move the Oklahoma City energy company into compliance with a Friday court order in Delaware.

The Oklahoma City energy company had previously said that if hedge fund TPG-Axon Capital were successful in its move to oust the SandRidge board, the action would constitute a “change of control” that could cost the company more than $4.3 billion. The company later backed off that figure.

Delaware Chancery Court Judge Leo E. Strine Jr. on Friday blocked the SandRidge board from soliciting votes in its ongoing proxy fight until it approved TPG-Axon's director candidates. The judge also said consent revocation votes in favor of the SandRidge board would not be counted until corrective action was taken.

SandRidge moved to meet that requirement Saturday, but did not announce the action until Tuesday morning.

“In light of the court's ruling, on March 9, 2013, the board approved of the director candidates proposed by the TPG-Axon group for the limited purpose of the change of control provisions of its indentures,” SandRidge said in a statement Tuesday.

While acknowledging a new board would not constitute a change of control, SandRidge restated its opposition to the ongoing proxy fight.

“The board continues to oppose the election of the director candidates proposed by the TPG-Axon group, believes their election is not in the best interest of the company's stockholders and recommends that stockholders support the company's existing experienced board of directors,” the company said.


by Adam Wilmoth
Energy Editor
Adam Wilmoth returned to The Oklahoman as energy editor in 2012 after working for four years in public relations. He previously spent seven years as a business reporter at The Oklahoman, including five years covering the state's energy sector....
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