Schilling's bloody sock from WS goes for $92,613

Published on NewsOK Modified: February 23, 2013 at 11:08 pm •  Published: February 23, 2013
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NEW YORK (AP) — A bloody sock worn by Curt Schilling while pitching for the Boston Red Sox in Game 2 of the 2004 World Series against the St. Louis Cardinals was sold for $92,613 at a live auction on Saturday night at the Fletcher-Sinclair Mansion.

Schilling had loaned his sock to the National Baseball Hall of Fame Museum but when his Rhode Island-based video game company "38 Studios" went bankrupt, he decided to sell the sock that was bloodied as he pitched on an injured ankle.

Bidding began at $25,000 several weeks ago. Texas-based Heritage Auctions anticipated it would get more than $100,000.

An anonymous bidder submitted the winning bid.

"It's a one of a kind item, so it's really tough to gauge what kind of interest you're going to get," Chris Ivy, director of Sports Auctions for Heritage Auctions said. "Sometimes you catch lightning in a bottle where a piece will take off like the Buckner ball. This particular time, it's the first time we sold a sock with blood on it so it's very hard to gauge what kind of final number it's going to end up."

Schilling helped end Boston's 86-year championship drought — the "Curse of the Bambino" — by pitching on an ankle that had been sutured more than once through the postseason. Pitching with a damaged tendon resulted in bleeding through the sock. Still, Schilling allowed only a run in six innings.

The right-hander made $114 million over an 18-year career with Baltimore, Houston, Philadelphia, Arizona and Boston but defaulted on loan payments to the state of Rhode Island.

Schilling's company was lured away from Massachusetts to Providence after Rhode Island's economic development agency in 2010 approved a $75 million loan guarantee. The company ran out of money less than two years later and filed for bankruptcy. Rhode Island is facing a tab of approximately $100 million related to the deal, including interest, and the agency is suing Schilling and others, saying it was misled.

Even with the large sale price, Rhode Island is not getting the proceeds from the sale. Schilling listed the sock as bank collateral in a filing in Massachusetts after investing roughly $50 million in the company and losing all his baseball earnings.

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