Scholarship program an example of publicly funded education at its best

by The Oklahoman Editorial Board Published: July 16, 2013
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“Especially when I look back at how she was two years ago when she was diagnosed, she's come so much further than I had even thought was possible for her — in a short amount of time,” Tara said. David Hood said, “At the start of the race, she was behind. And now she's caught up to a large degree.”

Phylicia Lewis, who attends Town & Country thanks to a scholarship, used to dread school, comparing it to “walking into a battlefield.” She was often picked on and spent her days crying. This is no longer the case.

“I don't get bullied anymore at school. I have friends now. I feel comfortable going to school. I like going to school. I laugh at school,” Phylicia said. “I actually have fun learning.” Her mother calls it a “joy to know that Phylicia doesn't have to worry about whether or not she can receive an education.”

Kyle Allen, who tutors one scholarship recipient, says, “The successes that we're having here and the successes that all these kids that are getting the scholarship are having does nothing but say — this can work. And it is working.”

Oklahomans should be proud of the Lindsey Nicole Henry scholarship program. In providing meaningful benefits to children with serious challenges, this program is an example of publicly funded education at its best — regardless of where that learning occurs.

by The Oklahoman Editorial Board
The Oklahoman Editorial Board consists of Gary Pierson, President and CEO of The Oklahoma Publishing Company; Christopher P. Reen, president and publisher of The Oklahoman; Kelly Dyer Fry, editor and vice president of news; Christy Gaylord...
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