School suspensions show major problem

Published: May 8, 2013

“Many questions linger over school suspensions” (Our Views, April 30) coddles the unruly but fails to offer any sympathy or relief to dependable students who have to put up with the disturbances created by the tardy and malingerers. Your concern for the unconcerned overlooks the straining impatience of the taxpayers who continue to dig down in their pockets to pay for the indifference or inattention of both those unruly students and the people responsible for them.

Worse, you fail to note the lack of leadership at the top of the local system, which apparently refused to stand by a middle manager's decision to take action in the field deemed necessary to good order. No doubt mistakes were made in execution but by your own admission, neither your writers nor public school leaders were aware of the seriousness of the situation. What the extreme response by the on-scene director did accomplish was to bring a major problem forward.

The big question lingering is to educate the American public that education is neither free nor a God-given right. Most taxpayers have no children in the system. Many have already paid or still are paying for the unruly while sending their own children to private schools in order to get away from the unruly as well as poor leadership at the top that can't seem to face problems head on.

Dick Hefton, Oklahoma City