Scientists' theories make good movies

Published: June 8, 2013
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Regarding "River has no bearing on tornadoes, scientist says" (News, June2): I have less faith in scientists than I do wives tales, folklore and legends. Many times scientific claims are far more outrageous and unbelievable than those things. In the 1970s scientists warned that we were on the edge of another ice age. Now we hear that we're all going to burn up as a result of manmade global warming. Other looming disasters on the horizon include asteroids slamming into and possibly destroying the earth.

While I agree that these claims have given Hollywood some good ideas for fiction movies, that's all they are — fiction. Using carbon dating, scientists claim to be able to tell the age of a dinosaur bone within a few million years. When the scientific community figures out where space ends and what lies beyond that point — and can prove it — I'll start taking them more seriously. Scientists don't like nature because they can't understand it or control it and never will. I'm no scientist, and have little formal education, but common sense tells me that it's possible and probable that abrupt changes in the terrain could interrupt the continuity of a vortex's contact with the surface, causing it to turn or lift. One of my observations is that all things of nature follow the path of least resistance — even dumb cows.

Kevin Wiyninger, Midwest City