Deseret Digital Media NewsOK publishes content from Deseret Digital Media, which has a network of websites that includes KSL.com, DeseretNews.com and FamilyShare.com.

Seattle gains some converts to the church of a higher minimum wage

Sally J. Clark, a member of the Seattle City Council that approved a raise in Seattle’s minimum wage from $9.32 per hour to $15, wants everyone to know “there's method to our madness,” according to a piece she wrote for CNN.com.
JJ Feinauer, Deseret News Modified: June 6, 2014 at 2:58 pm •  Published: June 6, 2014
Advertisement
;

Sally J. Clark, a member of the Seattle City Council that approved a raise in Seattle’s minimum wage from $9.32 per hour to $15, wants everyone to know “there's method to our madness,” according to a piece she wrote for CNN.com.

“The $15 per hour figure is a bit art and a bit science, but it's close to what experts say it costs in our area for a full-time worker to meet basic needs,” Clark explained. “A higher minimum wage means more stable individuals, families, neighborhoods and towns.”

Upping the minimum wage, according to Clark, will force companies to recognize the value of their workers. “If you think it's odd that a burger, fries and a shake can cost just $4, that's because that price is subsidized in part by the low wages paid to the people who cook, serve, and clean up after your meal.”

One major figure who has, seemingly, become increasingly aware of the impact of “subsidizing” fast food with low wages is the CEO of McDonald’s, Don Thompson.

“You know, our franchisees look at me when I say this and they start to worry: 'Don, don't you say it. Don't you say we support $10.10,” Thompson reportedly told students at Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management, according to the Huffington Post. “I will tell you we will support legislation that moves forward.”

The CEO of McDonald's isn’t the only one to catch the higher minimum wage bug. Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York has also changed his tune in recent weeks about raising the minimum pay for workers.

Cuomo, who historically has been skittish on the issue of a statewide minimum wage increase in New York, has now expressed support of the Working Families Party’s push for a higher minimum wage in the state.

Continue reading this story on the...