Sen. Jim Inhofe joins group fighting to keep prisoners in Cuba

BY CHRIS CASTEEL Modified: February 11, 2009 at 5:21 am •  Published: February 11, 2009
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photo - French President  Nicolas Sarkozy
French President Nicolas Sarkozy
WASHINGTON — Sen. Jim Inhofe on Tuesday helped a nonpartisan group launch a media ad opposing President Barack Obama’s order to close the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay.

Inhofe, R-Tulsa, praised the group, Move America Forward, and said he is pushing legislation that would prevent any of the prisoners from being moved to prisons in the United States.

Inhofe, who recently returned from a visit to the prison in Cuba, said the detainees are treated well and that the prison is serving a valuable purpose.

Asked whether the prisoners should remain at the prison indefinitely, Inhofe said, "I wish there were more choices. There really aren’t. I guess we could execute them. Do you want to do that?”

Melanie Morgan, Move America Forward chairman, said Obama’s "misguided” decision to close the prison would "impact the safety of every American.”

Attending the news conference were relatives of people killed in the 9/11 attacks and in the war in Iraq. The group’s television ad asks people to sign a petition opposing Obama’s order.

The president met last week with victims’ relatives of the 9/11 and USS Cole attacks and said he thinks closing the prison would keep the nation safe and ensure "swift and certain justice” for the detainees, according to the White House.


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U.S. lawyer makes

appeal for Briton

Air Force Lt. Col. Yvonne Bradley, an American military lawyer, met with British lawmakers Tuesday in an appeal to free British resident Binyam Mohamed from Guantanamo Bay. Although Mohamed’s release will be determined by his U.S. captors, Bradley says Britain can put more pressure on President Barack Obama.

French president’s visit signals a diplomatic role
President Nicolas Sarkozy paid the first visit to Iraq by a French head of state Tuesday, smoothing over resentment about France’s opposition to the war and positioning his country to cash in on lucrative arms and oil deals. The one-day visit signaled France’s intention to play a diplomatic role in a region dominated by the United States.

Associated Press

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