Share “Senate control could rest with well-funded...”

Senate control could rest with well-funded women

Published on NewsOK Modified: August 20, 2014 at 11:45 am •  Published: August 20, 2014
Advertisement

WASHINGTON (AP) — The political tilt of the Senate during President Barack Obama's final two years in office is likely to hinge on a handful of female contenders in tight and costly races.

Donors and fundraisers are catching on.

Five female Senate contenders recently created a joint fundraising committee, Blue Senate 2014, to appeal to donors. Separately, former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg last month wrote a $2 million check to a political committee linked to Emily's List, the biggest player helping elect women to office.

So far this election cycle, donors have handed over $46 million to a collection of political committees and candidates linked to Emily's List, which backs female contenders who support abortion rights. The Emily's List network of committees raised more than most other outside groups, including the GOP-backed American Crossroads and the anti-tax Club for Growth.

According to campaign finance documents filed Tuesday, one of the newest benefactors for Emily's List was Bloomberg. The billionaire former mayor gave to Women Vote, the super PAC run by the group.

The check put the mayor's giving to all super PACs this cycle at $11 million, and Bloomberg's total tally was likely to grow after Wednesday deadline for many groups to disclose their July fundraising.

But Bloomberg's donations reflect just how tight the contest to control the Senate next year is shaping up to be — and why women could be a decisive force behind Democratic efforts to defend their Senate majority.

It's why the Emily's List machine collected almost $6 million in July for campaign committees and candidates, according to a review of its tallies for state and federal fundraising efforts.

Republicans need to pick up six seats in the Senate to grab control. If they do, Obama would face the final two years of his presidency fighting a GOP-led Senate and a House that is expected to remain in Republican hands.

Female Senate contenders might have outsized sway in determining how Obama spends the balance of his time in office.

Among the races that are set to determine which political party controls the agenda in the Senate, incumbent Democratic senators Kay Hagan in North Carolina and Jeanne Shaheen in New Hampshire face heavy outside spending but have Emily's List backing. A third endangered Democrat, Sen. Mary Landrieu of Louisiana, chose not to seek Emily's List aid.

Continue reading this story on the...