Senate unveils workers' compensation overhaul bill

An Oklahoma Senate leadership bill to abolish the Oklahoma Workers' Compensation Court and replace it with an administrative system for compensating injured workers was unveiled Monday to a chorus of cheers and jeers.
by Randy Ellis Published: February 18, 2013
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A state Senate leadership bill to abolish the Oklahoma Workers' Compensation Court and replace it with an administrative system for compensating injured workers was unveiled Monday to a chorus of cheers and jeers.

The bill is 260 pages long.

“It's an incredible bill,” said Becky Robinson, assistant vice president of risk management for Hobby Lobby, an Oklahoma City-based retail store chain. “I think it's really unique and certainly does a lot for those that are supporting reform. It's bringing creativity to the pot.”

Workers' compensation attorney Bob Burke strongly disagreed.

“Senate Bill 1062 is a direct assault on the rights and benefits of Oklahoma workers who are injured on the job,” Burke said.

“The cuts in benefits are deep and unfair.”

Burke complained about a lengthy list of benefit cuts contained in the bill. For example, he said a worker making $500 a week would receive $20,000 less for an amputated arm, $16,000 less for an amputated hand and $24,000 less for a loss of hearing in both ears.

Senate leaders said the bill is modeled after the workers' compensation system in Arkansas.

The bill is designed to reduce the cost of workers' compensation premiums, while ensuring injured workers receive quality care in a timely manner, they said.

“The biggest roadblock to a stronger economy in Oklahoma is our adversarial workers' compensation system,” said Senate President Pro Tem Brian Bingman, who is co-authoring the bill, along with state Sen. Anthony Sykes, R-Moore.

“Worse yet, our adversarial system doesn't do a very good job of helping injured workers get the care they need to get healed and back to work,” said Bingman, R-Sapulpa. “The system is designed to reward trial lawyers for dragging cases out and delaying outcomes as long as possible.”

The bill is scheduled to be heard at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday by the Senate Judiciary Committee.

Praise, criticism

Senate leaders said Oklahoma's current judicial workers' compensation system is one of the most expensive in the nation.

They said a recent national study shows Oklahoma employers pay an average of $2.77 for every $100 in payroll, which is 147 percent of the national median and more than double the $1.19 per $100 of payroll that Arkansas employers pay.

“The Arkansas system is a model for states that want a system designed to help injured workers get the care they need without delay,” said Sykes, chairman of the Judiciary Committee.

“Oklahoma's small-business owners care about their employees, and they know they wouldn't be successful without them. I believe this system is the right solution for employees, and it's good for business.”

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by Randy Ellis
Capitol Bureau Reporter
For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two...
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