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Seven state employees fired after being named in Oklahoma veterans center resident's will

Bill Mack Marshall rewrote his will to give all his money to nine employees at the state-run veterans nursing home in Norman. Problem is the Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs strictly prohibits employees from participating in a financial transaction with any patient.
by Nolan Clay Modified: May 5, 2014 at 9:00 pm •  Published: May 5, 2014
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Six months before his death, decorated Korean War veteran Bill Mack Marshall rewrote his will to give all his money to nine employees at the state-run veterans nursing home in Norman.

Marshall, 80, died in May 2010, leaving them more than $200,000.

“He was a very bighearted guy,” A close friend, Mike Simmons, said.

Problem is the Oklahoma Department of Veterans Affairs strictly prohibits employees from participating in a financial transaction with any patient.

Seven employees at the Norman Veterans Center were fired in September for accepting money from the former Marine’s estate in violation of the policy.

They also are the focus of a criminal investigation, The Oklahoman has confirmed.

All seven insist they had the department’s permission to take the money.

They have appealed their dismissals to the Oklahoma Merit Protection Commission.

They also filed tort claims against the state. In those claims, they demanded to be reinstated with back pay and to be awarded $175,000 each for mental anguish, emotional distress, loss of professional reputation, embarrassment and humiliation.

The biggest beneficiary of the estate, maintenance technician David Wagner, turned down his gift — more than $150,000. He remains employed. Another beneficiary retired in 2010.

Statutes in place

At issue is whether Marshall, who went to the center after suffering a stroke, was financially exploited.

“He may have made that decision of his own free will but, as far as the employees working there, for them to be accepting ... inheritances or anything from someone they have been providing care for ... creates a serious conflict of interest,” said state Sen. Frank Simpson, who inquired into the circumstances behind the will.

“There are statutes in place right now to prevent that and they’re there for a good purpose,” said Simpson, R-Ardmore. “Someone who may not have any family ... could be in a very vulnerable situation.”

Marshall’s twin half-brothers wonder if he was exploited, particularly since Marshall did not even mention them in his will.

“It was just really odd,” said Bob Hancock, of Stroud.

In the typed November 2009 will, Marshall described the nine employees as friends. He misspelled some of their names.

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by Nolan Clay
Sr. Reporter
Nolan Clay was born in Oklahoma and has worked as a reporter for The Oklahoman since 1985. He covered the Oklahoma City bombing trials and witnessed bomber Tim McVeigh's execution. His investigative reports have brought down public officials,...
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