SF Bay Area trains run as strike talks drag on

Published on NewsOK Modified: October 17, 2013 at 2:40 am •  Published: October 17, 2013
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OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — The contentious talks between the San Francisco Bay Area Rapid Transit agency and its two largest unions have dragged on for six months — a period that has seen a chaotic dayslong strike, a cooling-off period and frazzled commuters wondering if they'll wake up to find the trains aren't running.

"We're going to do everything we can to avert a strike," Josie Mooney, a chief negotiator for Service Employees International Union Local 1021, said before entering talks Wednesday. "That doesn't mean we're not ready for a strike. That doesn't mean we're not able to pull off a work action. We don't want to."

Hundreds of thousands of commuters have endured seven strike deadlines, sometimes staying up past midnight waiting to hear if the trains will run in the morning.

On Wednesday, they waited until about 10:30 p.m. to receive word from a federal mediator that the transit system will continue to run Thursday as unions and management agree to keep talking.

The possibility of a strike appeared to dim earlier in the day when Local 1021 President Roxanne Sanchez said she was hopeful that her union and the Amalgamated Transit Union Local 1555 will come up with a deal by late Wednesday.

"We're asking that this process conclude tonight," Sanchez said. "We can do this. We should do this. It is within our grasp."

BART spokeswoman Alicia Trost said the agency has been flooded with calls and emails this week from commuters frustrated that they haven't been given earlier notices.

Neither side would say where negotiations stand.

But at least one person seems comfortable betting that a strike won't happen.

A spokeswoman for San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee announced Wednesday afternoon that he had left on a trip to Asia. After delaying his flight for two days to ready the city for a possible strike, Lee concluded that a walkout seemed unlikely and went ahead with the planned trip.

Federal mediator George Cohen said progress has been made but he has imposed a gag order on the parties.

The key issues have been salaries and worker contributions to their health and pension plans.

Talks began in April, three months before the June 30 contract expirations, but both sides were far apart. The unions initially asked for 23.2 percent in raises over three years. BART countered with a four-year contract with 1 percent raises contingent on the agency meeting economic goals.

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