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Should we start giving Dad a little more credit?

Reports in the media the last two weeks have marked a noteworthy shift for dads, who are not being embraced, even though they help in a lot of ways.
Herb Scribner, Deseret News Modified: May 27, 2014 at 9:06 am •  Published: May 28, 2014
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Do we really need dads?

Vincent Daly of The Huffington Post wrote Thursday that fathers often struggle with the expectations that accompany parenthood.

“We are told to ‘man up.’ We are told to accept this new phase in our lives rather than cower from it because to do any less would be a sign of weakness,” he wrote. “And so men seek out ways to cope. That may translate into burying ourselves deep in work, or more time at the gym, or even falling prey to vices that falsely promise a means to ease the pain.”

But it’s not just having kids where men are slipping away. Scott Stanley of Family Studies wrote on May 14 that men don’t really have interest in marrying, even though there are tremendous benefits to being a married man. Being married, Stanley wrote, helps men grow up and mature.

“In addition to being happier and healthier than bachelors, married men earn more money and live longer,” Stanley wrote. “And men can reap such benefits even from mediocre marriages, while for women, the benefits of marriage are more strongly linked to marital quality.”

There are reasons that society needs dad, though, according to Willis L. Krumholz of The Federalist. He wrote that as the American dream slips away from U.S. citizens, family traditions and importance is also being lost. Recent policy changes by the U.S. government are affecting the number of dads, too, and lessening their importance, Krumholz wrote.

But the importance of dads cannot be forgotten, Krumholz wrote.

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