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Small school basketball survives despite winter blast

People in small communities help dig each other out, make sure kids get in practice time before state tournament.
by Ryan Aber Published: February 27, 2013
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photo - Members of the Leedey basketball team stand next to a snow version of a state championship trophy made for them by people in town. Pictured are, bottom from left; Kennedy Winn, Taylor Welty, Jenna Trissel, Makayla Baker. Middle from left; Gentry Meyer, Rachel Penry. Top, from left; Cayla Whittington, Baili Collins, Blair Kauk, Sydney Harrel Jessie Harrel, Taya Haney and Macy Perkins. Photo provided
Members of the Leedey basketball team stand next to a snow version of a state championship trophy made for them by people in town. Pictured are, bottom from left; Kennedy Winn, Taylor Welty, Jenna Trissel, Makayla Baker. Middle from left; Gentry Meyer, Rachel Penry. Top, from left; Cayla Whittington, Baili Collins, Blair Kauk, Sydney Harrel Jessie Harrel, Taya Haney and Macy Perkins. Photo provided

Caldwell, like Beer, lives within walking distance of his home gym.

While Fargo has been out of school all week, the community held a hamburger feed and pep rally Wednesday night at the gym for the team.

As the storm moved in Monday morning, Beer started sending her players text messages to prepare to stay close to the gym for the week.

“The parents that came in, I just explained to them what the situation was,” Beer said. “Of course, we're a small community and everybody knows everybody so we went from there and fortunately we had all the food we needed.”

The Bison traveled to Oklahoma City on Wednesday night to prepare for its 7 p.m. tournament opener against Lomega on Thursday.

“We're a farming community, so if you look around town right now, you'll just see a bunch of John Deere tractors. Everyone's trying to dig each other out.”

As challenging as the week has been, the coaches realize it could've been worse.

“It's been probably as difficult as anything I have experienced as a coach,” Caldwell said. “It's been stressful but everybody's safe.”