Smart Moves: Home-buying tips for road warriors

Alan Pisarski, an expert on road travel, recommends that car-bound road warriors choose a location with relatively easy access to major highways, ideally in a mid-size city that's normally free of traffic congestion.
by Ellen James Martin Published: December 13, 2013
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As the economy heads toward recovery, the number of road warriors — people who travel constantly for work — is rebounding dramatically.

“Business travel is back with a vengeance,” said Chris McGinnis, an expert on the topic and director of the consulting firm Travel Skills Group (www.travelskills.com).

Are you a road warrior, someone who does at least 10 business trips annually? And are you also a prospective homebuyer who seeks a location that will enhance, rather than detract from, your hectic lifestyle?

If so, McGinnis said that in the ideal world, you'll move to a region with excellent airport access.

While air travel for business is increasing, the vast majority of business travel still involves driving. Among those traveling often by highway are consultants, pharmaceutical company representatives and salespeople.

Alan Pisarski, an expert on road travel and author of “Commuting in America,” recommends that car-bound road warriors choose a location with relatively easy access to major highways, ideally in a mid-size city that's normally free of traffic congestion.

“The first rule is to be in a suburb near an interstate highway so you can get on your way quickly without having to fight your way through colossal city traffic,” said Pisarski (www.alanpisarski.com).

Here are a few home-buying pointers for road warriors:

• Factor time and stress management into your equation.

Business travelers typically know how many days per month they must devote to trips. But some fail to factor in the required preparation time for their trips and the time needed to decompress after the trip is over.

In advance of a house-hunting expedition, Merrill Ottwein, a real estate broker and a past president of the National Association of Exclusive Buyer Agents (www.naeba.org), recommends you write down the specifics of when and where you travel, doing a tally of the hours you typically expend. This will help you foresee how much time and energy you have left for ground transportation hassles and domestic chores.



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