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Some medications or health conditions don't mix with Oklahoma's summer heat

Oklahoma's blazing sun is especially dangerous to people with heart conditions and other chronic illnesses, as well as those who take some common medications.
BY SONYA COLBERG scolberg@opubco.com Published: July 22, 2011
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Oklahoma's sun is an even greater risk to homeless veteran Gary Matthews and others with certain medical conditions or who take specific medications.

The former Army helicopter pilot thought he could just work off his ankle injury after he stumbled in a cobblestone street in Germany. Instead, he found himself on the verge of death when a blood clot formed in a deep vein, then broke off and traveled to his lung.

While he survived the pulmonary embolism, it forced him out of the Army and is now forcing him to stay sheltered, with his family, from Oklahoma's blazing heat.

“We had a house in Germany and the summer temperatures were in the 70s and 80s. Coming here was a big shock,” Matthews said.

The family moved here from Wisconsin to be near his parents. In May, his pastor helped Matthews, his wife, Raffaela, their 2-year-old daughter, Larissa, and 4-month-old daughter, Chiara, find an opening at the Salvation Army shelter, where they've lived the last couple of months.

He must stay inside, under the shelter's air conditioning because his medical condition puts him at greater risk in steamy weather.

Illness, drugs and heat

In hot weather, patients like Matthews are more prone to pooling of the blood in the veins, according to Dr. Scott Dellinger, OU Medical Center emergency room physician.

“Your vessels are maximally dilated, trying to release as much heat as they can. So it does cause more venous pooling,” Dellinger said.

“Once you've had a clot, the veins are scarred. They're going to hurt. When they swell, they're going to hurt more. Anybody who's ever had a clot is going to be at risk of forming another clot.”

Doctors say certain patients — especially those with chronic illnesses and people using some rather common medications — must avoid Oklahoma's triple-digit temperatures.

“Specifically, anyone with heart conditions. The heat places special stress on the heart. So they need to try to stay cool, take it pretty easy,” said Dr. Bobby Rader, a St. Anthony family practice physician.

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