Some of Sandusky's jurors hoping for life sentence

Associated Press Modified: October 7, 2012 at 2:31 am •  Published: October 6, 2012
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"This is what prisons are for, you know," Harper said. "I mean, I don't think you let a guy loose like that."

He also felt the victim testimony was pivotal.

"It was such a consistent pattern of behavior," Harper said. "It was just so solid. The defense was just so thin. There was no evidence that these kids were lying. Even the minor inconsistencies that the defense tried to bring up — and did bring up — that made it more convincing."

Through a relative, juror Ann T. Van Kuren said she also plans to attend.

Barnes and Harper both said they hoped to learn more about what Penn State officials did or did not do in 1998 and 2001 after getting complaints about Sandusky showering with boys. That was a major theme of the report issued to Penn State this summer by Louis Freeh, the former FBI director, and is likely also to arise during civil litigation by Sandusky's victims against the university.

"We don't know the whole story to this whole thing yet," said Barnes, a Nittany Lions fan who felt so strongly that Joe Paterno's statue should remain in place that she went to the scene outside Beaver Stadium the day it was removed in July, about a month after the verdict. "I just felt like they jumped ship, they didn't do the right thing, that they needed more information. What's going to happen if Curley and Schultz are found not guilty?"

Tim Curley, the school's athletic director on leave, and Gary Schultz, a retired vice president, are awaiting trial on charges they did not properly report suspected abuse and lied to the grand jury that investigated Sandusky. Paterno, the school's Hall of Fame coach, was fired after Sandusky was arrested in November and died of lung cancer in January.

The names of Curley, Schultz and even Paterno did not come up in deliberations, Andrews said.

"I don't know what to think about Curley and Schultz," she said. "I think Joe Paterno was and is and has been falsely accused of many things. I don't think the man was informed of the detail for him to understand how serious this was."

Sandusky's sentencing on Tuesday will begin with Cleland determining whether he qualifies as a sexually violent predator, a status that would require lifetime registration if he is ever paroled.


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