Some Oklahoma school districts consider grade-policy changes

Oklahoman Modified: April 3, 2013 at 8:45 pm •  Published: April 4, 2013
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At a glance

District EOI grade-change policies

Some school districts are considering whether to give course credit to students who failed a class but passed state-mandated end-of-instruction exams. Here's what some Oklahoma districts are doing:

• Choctaw-Nicoma Park: No such policy exists, said Meda Beall, assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction. But the link between EOI testing and coursework has raised questions. “You bring a student back in to a class where they've already passed the EOI, and their mindset is, ‘But the state says I have mastered this class.' We have had discussions about this,” Beall said. “It has created a dilemma.”

• Crooked Oak: No such policy exists, Superintendent Brad Richards said. “We do not give credit if someone passes the EOI unless they pass the class,” he said.

• Edmond: No such policy exists, spokeswoman Susan Parks-Schlepp said. “It has been discussed in the district but we don't currently allow that,” she said.

• Guthrie: Students who pass an EOI but fail a class receive a P for pass instead of an F, secondary education director Chad Wilson said.

• Lawton: No such policy exists.

• Midwest City-Del City: Students who pass an EOI exam on the first attempt receive a grade bump of one letter, according to district policy. The same is true for students who score a 3 or better on Advanced Placement exams.

• Millwood: Students who master an EOI may receive one grade higher in a course, Superintendent Gloria Griffin said. “For example, if their grade is advanced, but they made a C, the teacher may move it to a B,” Griffin said. “This is determined by the teacher when they evaluate the level of what you know.”

• Moore: No such policy exists, curriculum director Rick Cobb said. “I'm torn because I don't want to undermine the value of what our teachers do for 36 weeks, but at the same time, the most important thing is whether students have learned a subject well,” Cobb said. “That's more important than anything else. I'd never want to hold a student back when they've mastered the content.”

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