Special effects master Ray Harryhausen dies at 92

Published on NewsOK Modified: May 7, 2013 at 4:57 pm •  Published: May 7, 2013
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In contrast to the millions spent on digital effects today, Harryhausen made his magic on a shoestring. His first effort, "The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms" (1953), cost $250,000 for the entire film. He commented wryly in 1998: "I find it rather amusing to sit through the on-screen credits today, seeing the names of 200 people doing what I once did by myself."

He found ways to economize. For "It Came from Beneath the Sea" (1955) he employed an octopus with six tentacles instead of eight. That saved time.

"Jason and the Argonauts" (1963) demonstrated the intricacy of Harryhausen's tricks. He had three live actors dueling seven skeletons. It took four months to produce a few minutes on the screen.

Other notable achievements included the film "Earth vs. the Flying Saucers," where aliens slice through the Washington Monument and crash into the U.S. Capitol. He also was behind "The Golden Voyage of Sinbad," where a one-eyed centaur battles a part-lion, part-eagle creature known as a griffin.

Harryhausen's film "The Clash of the Titans" (1981), did have a big budget and major cast: Laurence Olivier, Maggie Smith, Burgess Meredith, Harry Hamlin and Claire Bloom. Hamlin as Perseus struggled to tame a white-winged Pegasus and to battle the snake-haired Medusa.

After the film, Harryhausen retired, explaining, "I was tired of spending year after year in a dark room."

He and his wife, Diana, lived in London, where he fashioned bronze replicas of his movie creations. He often appeared at fantasy conventions and in 1992 received a special award from the Motion Picture Academy.

Darren G. Davis, the publisher of Bluewater Productions, called Harryhausen's death the passing of an icon.

"From the first time I saw 'Jason and the Argonauts' and 'Clash of the Titans,' I was spellbound," he said of the man whose imprint is found on Bluewater's "Ray Harryhausen Presents" comic anthology. "I feel so blessed for the opportunity to have worked with him through the years on numerous comic adaptations, graphic novel sequels and other projects based on his visionary work."

Bradbury, who had met Harryhausen in 1938 and wrote the story for "The Beast from 20,000 Fathoms," one said of the film master: "He and I made a pact to grow old but never grow up — to keep the pterodactyl and the tyrannosaurus forever in our hearts."

Harryhausen is survived by his wife and daughter, Vanessa.

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Matt Moore in Philadelphia and Bob Thomas in Los Angeles contributed to this report.