Spurs-Thunder: 'Old Man Riverwalk' keeps rolling along

COMMENTARY — Tim Duncan remains a preeminent player on the NBA’s best team in the regular season and what’s looking like the best team in the playoffs, too. But the Spurs’ star knows the sun has started to set.
by Berry Tramel Published: May 20, 2014


photo -  
                 Tim Duncan celebrates a basket during the Spurs’ Game 1 win in the Western Conference Finals on Monday. 
                   Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman
Tim Duncan celebrates a basket during the Spurs’ Game 1 win in the Western Conference Finals on Monday. Photo by Sarah Phipps, The Oklahoman

SAN ANTONIO — Tim Duncan doesn’t live in the past, which is not so easy when you’ve got such a glorious history. But Duncan has been blessed with a rare gift. Duncan sees himself as he is.

Michael Jordan didn’t acknowledge Father Time. Kobe Bryant doesn’t seem to, either. Most NBA superstars don’t, at twilight time. They believe themselves to be what they once were.

But Duncan knows better. Knows he’s not the same player now that he was at 21, or 27, or 33. Not the horse who could average 25 points and 12 rebounds a game. Not the stoic franchise player whose consistency earned him the nickname “Groundhog Day.”

Duncan remains a preeminent player on the NBA’s best team in the regular season and what’s looking like the best team in the playoffs, too. But Duncan knows the sun has started to set.

Obviously I'm not as effective as I used to be, and my legs aren't what they used to be.

“I can't do everything I used to do.”

“I always show up and assume that the game depends on me. I know it does a lot less in these years and this season.”

Imagine a Jordan or a Kobe or a Shaq saying that. But all those words came from Duncan himself. And yet, Monday night in Game 1 of the Western Conference Finals, Duncan scored 27 points as the Spurs routed the Thunder 122-105. Duncan scored 21 in the first half alone, making nine of 12 shots. Only five players in NBA history aged 38 or older have scored at least 27 points in a playoff game.

“It’s incredible,” said longtime teammate Manu Ginobili, no spring chicken himself at age 36. “I’ve never seen him stretch a muscle. I don’t know how he does it. He keeps playing, he keeps scoring, with the same face, doing the same thing. So effectively and reliably. He’s one of a kind.”

Duncan is one of the 10 best NBA players ever. You just wouldn’t know it by the spotlight. It’s not the San Antonio way. Not Duncan’s way. He just plays. Changes his game and plays. Develops an outside shot now that his post-up moves don’t work so well. Knows all the angles now that he no longer can jump over outmatched foes.

Old Man Riverwalk, as they’ve been calling Duncan for years, made 11 baskets against the Thunder in Game 1. Two were on outside jumpers. Most were out of the flow of a nifty San Antonio offense, on rolls to the basket or lay-ins when the Thunder defense got lost.

Duncan doesn’t really explode too often. He had just two games this season with more than 27 points. Had just four games with more than the 19 shots he took in Game 1.


by Berry Tramel
Columnist
Berry Tramel, a lifelong Oklahoman, sports fan and newspaper reader, joined The Oklahoman in 1991 and has served as beat writer, assistant sports editor, sports editor and columnist. Tramel grew up reading four daily newspapers — The Oklahoman,...
+ show more


Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    Angels' Garrett Richards has torn knee tendon, will miss pennant drive
  2. 2
    Tulsa minister charged in $930,000 scheme might have embezzled more
  3. 3
    Nick Cannon Confirms He And Wife Mariah Carey Are Living Apart
  4. 4
    School Required Reading That Will Change Your Life
  5. 5
    OSU basketball: Cowboys release complete schedule
+ show more