St. Anthony set to start final phase of Midtown campus expansion

St. Anthony Hospital is set to move forward with the last phase of a $220 million master plan expansion launched after it agreed to a deal with Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County to retain its historic Midtown campus.
by Steve Lackmeyer Modified: May 22, 2014 at 5:00 pm •  Published: May 21, 2014
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St. Anthony Hospital is set to move forward with the last phase of a $220 million master plan expansion launched after it agreed to a deal with Oklahoma City and Oklahoma County to retain its historic Midtown campus.

The emergency room and intensive care pavilion, first announced in 2012, was put on hold and redesigned to eliminate two stories of structured parking and allow for easier ambulance access, said Kyle Nondorf, chief operating officer of SMM Healthcare, which owns St. Anthony.

In a presentation to the Downtown Design Review Committee, Rees Associates architect Melanie Compton said the changes include relocating new mechanical systems into other existing space and moving the ambulance entry to Dewey Avenue instead of along NW 10. Compton said a previous design resolution of concerns about noise and vibration will not change.

“In the fall of last year, we met with the architects and the contractor and started to evaluate how to be better stewards of resources and meet our original intent with pavilion,” Nondorf said. “We looked at a redesign that would meet our long-term needs.”

Elimination of the garage dropped the height of the structure, which will be immediately south of Kaiser’s American Bistro, from six to four stories. The change, Nondorf said, provides EMSA with improved access for ambulances. He said the remaining three floors were changed to standardized layouts to improve familiarity with operations for nurses who might switch from one area to another.

A dozen years ago, St. Anthony Hospital officials were contemplating leaving what was then a very different neighborhood littered with flophouses, a motel that was frequented by prostitutes and drug dealers, and abandoned properties that included the landmark Plaza Court Building across the street.


by Steve Lackmeyer
Business Reporter
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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In the fall of last year, we met with the architects and the contractor and started to evaluate how to be better stewards of resources and meet our original intent with pavilion. We looked at a redesign that would meet our long-term needs.”

Kyle Nondorf,
Chief operating officer of SMM Healthcare

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