Star Robert Pattinson remains bewildered by the 'Twilight' phenomenon

As the final film, “Breaking Dawn — Part 2,” opens, the blockbuster “Twilight” saga's leading man Robert Pattinson says the role of a kindhearted 100-year-old vampire in love with a human presented some particularly stubborn challenges right up to the end.
by Brandy McDonnell Published: November 15, 2012
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Pop culture phenomenon

As “Twilight” has emerged as a pop culture phenomenon — the first four films grossed $1 billion at the domestic box office alone, for instance — it has transformed the Englishman into an internationally known heartthrob.

“I think it was the third movie where we went to Munich, and the entire Olympic Stadium was filled with fans, and just to walk in there and do nothing — I mean, it was supposed to be a Q and A — but it was me, Kristen and Taylor, (and) we just stood in the Olympic Stadium with 30,000 people just screaming ... for 15 minutes. And it was just, I mean, it's absolutely bizarre. There's no way you can ever compute it,” Pattinson said.

Still, the leading man doesn't fear that the series will leave him typecast.

“It's not really up to you. I'm getting other parts that aren't vampires or whatever, but I don't know if people will, you know, accept me in them or whatever. I mean, there's really nothing to be afraid of,” he said.

“I don't know how people will remember this series at all. I mean, it's crazy how intense people are. The fan base is still five years on, so I don't know how long it's going to last.”

Nor he is worried about topping or maintaining the level of box office success or pop culture influence he has reached as the man who became Edward Cullen.

“I think it's impossible for one thing. I don't think anyone can do that, apart from Denzel Washington, who I don't know, he's done something,” Pattinson said with a laugh.

“I don't know, it's not necessarily that satisfying getting kind of monetary success, but sometimes it, it keeps the door open to make what you want to make. But other times, you could make five massive hits in a row and still not get cast by the directors who you want work with doing little movies.

“There are no guarantees. I'm trying to kind of sign up and do movies that I'll be proud of if it's my last one. That's kind of how I think about it.”

Travel and accommodations provided by Summit Entertainment.

by Brandy McDonnell
Entertainment Reporter
Brandy McDonnell, also known by her initials BAM, writes stories and reviews on movies, music, the arts and other aspects of entertainment. She is NewsOK’s top blogger: Her 4-year-old entertainment news blog, BAM’s Blog, has notched more than 1...
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