State's Progressive Baptists plan gathering

The Progressive Oklahoma Baptist Convention will host its annual conference Monday through Wednesday in Oklahoma City.
by Carla Hinton Modified: May 3, 2013 at 4:58 pm •  Published: May 4, 2013
Advertisement
;

As part of the Progressive Baptists' education initiative, many members of churches within the convention have become volunteers in their local schools to mentor students, provide test monitoring, hall monitoring and other services. He said clergy members have been particularly concerned about bullying and have worked with students at Douglass High School on that issue.

Dorn said the convention also has partnered with AmeriCare Institute to offer short-term career training for people in the community who are underemployed or unemployed. “It's short term so that folks can get trained and get on the job sooner,” he said.

Also, high school students are being offered resources and support to help them become successful whether they plan to get vocational training or attend college after high school.

With a focus on health care, the convention partnered with the state Health Department's Office of Minority Health to look at ways to address health disparities in the metro area ZIP codes where many of the convention's churches are located. He said the convention joined with other faith groups to partner with a university's school of nursing for health visits to elementary schools and churches.

Also, Dorn said several churches have adopted programs designed to educate members about living a healthier lifestyle.

“Where we had doughnuts out before, we have fruit and veggie trays out now,” Dorn said.

He said the convention's outreach is sure to expand as clergy and their congregations look for solutions to community concerns.

“We as a faith community have to go outside the walls of the church with what God has blessed us with to provide solutions and strategies so that we may overcome some of those disparities,” Dorn said.

by Carla Hinton
Religion Editor
Carla Hinton, an Oklahoma City native, joined The Oklahoman in 1986 as a National Society of Newspaper Editors minority intern. She began reporting full-time for The Oklahoman two years later and has served as a beat writer covering a wide...
+ show more


Related Articles

Fellowship is great, but when we've got problems in our community where we are the highest community in heart disease and teen pregnancy and dropouts and unemployment, as a faith-based community, we are spiritual leaders that I feel in my heart God has called us, purposed us and empowered us to address those issues.”

The Rev. James Dorn,

Trending Now


AROUND THE WEB

  1. 1
    'Maze Runner' finds way to box office victory
  2. 2
    The first games that show off iOS 8's graphics are available for download
  3. 3
    Morrison grabs second half winner to hand his side all three points
  4. 4
    Foxes launch comback to secure stunning victory
  5. 5
    WATCH LIVE: Thousands Take To The Streets For The People's Climate March
+ show more