Studies announced to prevent water shortages in Oklahoma

In-depth water studies will be performed in three of Oklahoma’s most water-challenged regions to evaluate strategies for avoiding future water shortages, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board announced Thursday.
by Randy Ellis Modified: July 18, 2014 at 12:00 pm •  Published: July 17, 2014
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In-depth water studies will be performed in three of Oklahoma’s most water-challenged regions to evaluate strategies for avoiding future water shortages, the Oklahoma Water Resources Board announced Thursday.

“These focused studies will be critical to addressing potential water supply challenges not just for water users who are at the greatest risk of shortages in coming decades, but also for the state as a whole,” said J.D. Strong, executive director of the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

The board developed a watershed map of Oklahoma that divided the state into 82 basins. The three basins selected for the studies are among 12 “hot-spot” basins most likely to experience water shortages within the next 50 years, according to the 2012 update of the Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan.

Sites selected for the studies are Watershed Basin 26, which is part of the Beaver-Cache Watershed Planning Region near Duncan; Basin 38, which is part of the Southwest Watershed Planning Region near Altus; and Basin 51, which is part of the Central Watershed Planning Region located between Yukon and Watonga.

Those three sites were selected because each site has a different type of water challenge, but solutions to those challenges are expected to have applications in other parts of the state, as well, said Cole Perryman, director of communications for the Oklahoma Water Resources Board.

The study for the basin near Duncan will focus on water conservation practices with an emphasis on public water supply, officials said. It will look at how to use irrigation technology and best practices to become more efficient. Officials also will study current and prospective plumbing codes, investigate a tiered water rate structure and look into the creation of local outreach and educational programs.

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by Randy Ellis
Capitol Bureau Reporter
For the past 30 years, staff writer Randy Ellis has exposed public corruption and government mismanagement in news articles. Ellis has investigated problems in Oklahoma's higher education institutions and wrote stories that ultimately led to two...
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