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Stupid things I've done as a parent

We've all been there, done that. All parents make mistakes. Check out this list and get some real stories from real parents.
Heather Hale, FamilyShare Modified: February 26, 2014 at 7:52 pm •  Published: May 17, 2014
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Every one of us has experienced a bad parenting moment. Whether it's accidentally locking a child in a house or a car, injuring our precious little one or failing to plan ahead — we all have a story to tell. Check out this list of real stories from real parents. Learn from their mistakes, and you'll probably walk away feeling better about your own mishaps.

1. Marketplace mishap

Carmen L. shares that, "Shortly after becoming a mommy of six, I attempted a trip to SAM's club with all six children and no husband. The kids were so good and even helpful. We completed the shopping and went to the checkout. The clerk rang up the goods, I swiped my debit card and then the clerk told me it didn't go through. I swiped it, again. Still nothing. He asked if I was sure there was enough funds in the bank to use my debit card. I took it as an insult. Then he asked if I had cash or check. I had neither. The manager came over to see if he could help and discovered that my debit card had expired the day before. I was so frustrated that I just scooped the two littlest out of the cart, said, "we're leaving" to the other four and stormed out of the store. We got to the car and my four-year-old asked, "Why didn't we bring the food?" And I lost it. I had a huge meltdown. Looking back, the only stupid thing about the whole experience was the way that I handled it. Truthfully, I wasn't in a mental state to be able to handle it, but I acted poorly and set a bad example to my kids. They still ask me if I have the right card when we go to SAM's club."

Lesson — Face challenging situations with a deep breath and sense of humor, and always take along some cash.

2. Keep calm and get the keys.

Kasey B. writes, "My daughter was sleeping in her crib and my two-year-old was playing quietly with his trains so I decided to take the trash out. When I came back in I went to open the door and it was locked. I was freaking out! No one else in our apartment building was home so I decided to just drive to my husband's work and get his key. I was frantic and crying the whole time. When I got home and opened the door, my son looked up from where he was playing — calm as could be — and said, 'Hi mom.' I, of course, was still a wreck and cried and gave him a huge hug and lots of kisses. Since that happened, my husband showed me how to get into our apartment without a key."