Subway strike suspended for 2 days in Sao Paulo

Published on NewsOK Modified: June 9, 2014 at 7:49 pm •  Published: June 9, 2014
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SAO PAULO (AP) — Leaders of striking subway workers announced Monday night the union was suspending for two days a work stoppage that has thrown traffic into chaos in Sao Paulo before the city hosts the World Cup's opening game this week.

But in a statement on the union's website, leaders said they would hold a vote Wednesday to determine if their strike would resume Thursday — the day the tournament's first match will be played in Sao Paulo.

The union is seeking a 12 percent wage hike but the government says it won't offer anything above 8.7 percent. Meetings between government officials and union representatives on Monday stalled on that point.

Authorities are deeply worried about the strike because the subway is the main means of transportation for fans who will attend the tournament's initial game between Brazil and Croatia. The stadium is about 20 kilometers (12 miles) east of central Sao Paulo, where most tourists stay.

There were hopes the work stoppage might be resolved sooner than that as union officials met for the first time in days with government authorities in talks that continued into Monday night.

Earlier in the day, riot police fired tear gas to force about 100 striking workers out of the station on the fifth day of a subway strike that has thrown Sao Paulo's normally congested traffic into chaos.

"This is the way they negotiate, with tear gas and repression," Alexandre Roldan, a union leader, said as he and others strikers regrouped outside the station following the confrontation.

Altino Prazeres, president of the union leading the strike, said almost all of the 8,000 subway employees had walked out in the past few days. He marched along with workers on a street in central Sao Paulo and said they were not interested in disrupting the World Cup.

"I love soccer! I support our national team. The point is not to stop the Cup," he said. "We want to resolve this today and all are willing to negotiate."

Prazeres said workers were willing to negotiate a lower raise if the state-run subway company offered more benefits, but managers have refused to agree.

A spokeswoman for the subway company declined to answer questions. About half of the city's subway stations were operating, but with greatly diminished service. Many of the city's key intersections were jammed with cars and trucks, and traffic was moving very slowly elsewhere.

Sao Paulo state's transport secretary, Jurandir Fernandes, told local reporters that 60 striking workers had been fired, and union officials began hearing of their members receiving telegrams announcing the dismissal.