Tapstone Energy to start Mideke Building renovation

A $17 million conversion of the Mideke Building into the headquarters for Tapstone Energy is set to begin in June, following the Bricktown Urban Design Committee’s unanimous approval of plans to replace the east alley wall of the warehouse with a transparent glass facade.
by Steve Lackmeyer Modified: May 15, 2014 at 7:00 pm •  Published: May 14, 2014
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A $17 million conversion of the Mideke Building into the headquarters for Tapstone Energy is set to begin next month after the Bricktown Urban Design Committee’s unanimous approval Wednesday of plans to replace the east alley wall of the warehouse with a transparent glass facade.

The vote went against a recommendation by Assistant City Planner Michael Philbrick to reject the modifications over concerns the renovation would detract from the building’s historic character. Philbrick noted the development team, led by Andy Burnett, was proposing to replace 67 percent of the brick with glass on the top floors of the east alley facade.

That change, he reported, could cost the building its 1983 placement on the National Register of Historic Places. The building at 100 E Main was built in 1919 with several subsequent additions over following years, and was home to Mideke Supply Co. for 87 years.

“There is a significant loss of brick material on the east side of the building, and we believe that brick is a significant part of the character of the building,” Philbrick said. “It’s a key reason it’s listed on the National Register. ... In place of that brick, we’re getting a glass-paneled wall, despite the fact that it’s something the guidelines say we should not use.”

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by Steve Lackmeyer
Business Reporter
Steve Lackmeyer is a reporter and columnist who started his career at The Oklahoman in 1990. Since then, he has won numerous awards for his coverage, which included the 1995 bombing of the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building, the city's Metropolitan...
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There is a significant loss of brick material on the east side of the building, and we believe that brick is a significant part of the character of the building. It’s a key reason it’s listed on the National Register.

Michael

Philbrick,
Assistant City Planner

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