Tech briefs, Aug.5, 2014

Tech briefs, Aug.5, 2014
Oklahoman Published: August 5, 2014
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Tech bytes

P.F. Chang says card breach’s over

P.F. Chang’s is providing more details on its ongoing investigation into a security breach, saying data may have been stolen from certain credit and debit cards used at 33 P.F. Chang’s China Bistro restaurants in the U.S. P.F. Chang’s confirmed in June that data from credit and debit cards used at its restaurants was stolen, but didn’t specify the locations at that time. On Monday the company provided a list of locations. These include P.F. Chang’s restaurants in Baltimore; St. Louis; Pittsburgh; Austin, Texas; and Charlotte, N.C. A list of all 33 locations, as well as the dates that cards may have been compromised, can be found at pfchangs.com/security. The company said that potentially stolen data includes the card number and may also include the cardholder’s name and/or the card’s expiration date in some instances. P.F. Chang’s said the security compromise has been contained and that it has been processing credit and debit card data securely since June 11. The restaurant operator noted that as the investigation continues it may identify other locations where data may have been compromised or other date ranges. P.F. Chang’s China Bistro Inc., based in Scottsdale, Ariz., owns its namesake restaurants and Pei Wei Asian Diners.

LinkedIn to pay $6M in back wages

Professional networking service LinkedIn has agreed to pay nearly $6 million in unpaid wages and damages to 359 current and former employees, the Labor Department said on Monday. The U.S. Department of Labor said an investigation found LinkedIn Corp. in violation of overtime and record-keeping rules that are part of the federal Fair Labor Standards Act. It said the violations occurred at company branches in California, Illinois, Nebraska and New York. Mountain View, Calif.-based LinkedIn said in a statement that it was “eager to work closely with the (Labor Department) to quickly and equitably rectify this situation. This was a function of not having the right tools in place for a small subset of our sales force to track hours properly; prior to the (Labor Department) approaching us, we had already begun to remedy this.” The company agreed to pay the back wages once it was notified of the violations and to take steps to prevent them from happening again. Federal law requires that hourly employees get paid 1.5 times their regular hourly rates for hours they work beyond 40 per week.

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