The logic behind proposed amendment to ban Sharia law

Modified: June 10, 2012 at 11:11 pm •  Published: June 11, 2012
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Ryan Kiesel (Point of View, June 2) complained about the Oklahoma Senate passing an amendment to prevent state courts from enforcing or using foreign laws. That amendment didn't make its way through the House; therefore, it's unworthy of serious discussion. Kiesel, however, attempted to lampoon the very thought of such a law since it's never been an issue in Oklahoma courts. The fact that the use of Sharia law has been attempted in other states, which Kiesel carefully skirted, is reason enough to block such usage before the fact. As the cowboys say, “Fix the fence before the cows get out.”

Kiesel suggested the Senate's proposal was a product of anti-Muslim groups. I suspect he's correct, but does that mean we have no right to oppose what we believe to be wrong? I've read the Koran several times. It's the basis for Sharia law. I took note of what most Christians would surely classify as questionable or radical statements against non-Muslims.

Logic suggests guarding against encroachment of Sharia law into our state laws. It's also logical to guard against encroachment of any laws created by any body other than our own Legislature.

Ott Johnson, Stillwater