Think tank alleges racial discrimination in University of Oklahoma admissions

by Silas Allen Published: October 23, 2012
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OU recently adopted a holistic admissions policy that allows the university to admit students who might have been rejected under the university's automatic admissions requirements. That new policy includes a range of admissions considerations that weren't included in the old system, but the applicant's race isn't among them.

In a statement, Bishop said the university uses outreach and recruiting practices, rather than racial preferences, to promote campus diversity.

“It is unfortunate that the university was not contacted or provided an opportunity to participate in the (center's) study,” she said. “Had the university been contacted, we might have been able to clarify items that seem to be misunderstood by those who prepared the report.”

The use of racial preferences in college admissions has been the subject of scrutiny following a case that came before the U.S. Supreme Court this month. The suit was brought by a Texas woman who claimed she was denied admittance into the University of Texas because she is white.

Abigail Noel Fisher, a graduate of Steven F. Foster High School in Sugar Land, Texas, challenged the state university's admissions policy after she was rejected by the school in 2008. UT guarantees admission to students in the top 10 percent of their high school classes, but Fisher's 3.59 GPA was not enough to make the grade.

UT admits a certain number of other students, for whom race, leadership experience, socioeconomic status and other factors can provide an admissions advantage.

by Silas Allen
General Assignment/Breaking News Reporter
Silas Allen is a news reporter for The Oklahoman. He is a Missouri native and a 2008 graduate of the University of Missouri.
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WHAT'S NEXT?

Oklahomans will go to the polls in two weeks to vote on a ballot measure that seeks to end affirmative action for education. State Question 759 would amend the Oklahoma Constitution to ban special treatment based on race or sex in public hiring, education or contracts. The state question will appear on the Nov. 6 ballot.

Had the university been contacted, we might have been able to clarify items that seem to be misunderstood by those who prepared the report.”

Catherine Bishop

University of Oklahoma spokeswoman

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