Tour manager may be key to stage collapse lawsuits

Associated Press Modified: April 16, 2012 at 7:16 pm •  Published: April 16, 2012
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MERRILLVILLE, Ind. (AP) — The tour manager who was widely credited with saving the lives of country duo Sugarland before a deadly stage collapse at last summer's Indiana State Fair has become a central focus of lawyers seeking millions in damages for the families of seven people who died and dozens who were injured.

Fair officials say they had a concert promoter ask the band twice to delay the Aug. 13 concert because of concerns about severe weather, but were rebuffed. Investigative reports unveiled last week said tour manager Hellen Rollens told a state fair representative, "It's only rain. We can play."

About 55 minutes of last week's videotaped deposition from Sugarland lead singer Jennifer Nettles in Charleston, W. Va., was released Monday by Merrillville attorney Kenneth J. Allen, who represents victims of the stage collapse. In it, Nettles said that she wasn't aware what fans were told about the timing of the concert.

"I don't know if anybody was told anything," she said.

Asked if she felt responsible for the safety of the fans given the heavy equipment on stage, she said, "I don't feel it's my responsibility or my management's responsibility to evacuate the fans in case of danger. Do I care about their safety? Absolutely."

Nettles appeared taken aback when she was asked by Allen whether she blamed her fans for waiting.

"No. Of course not," she said.

Sugarland spokesman Allan Mayer said Monday that Nettles and Bush say they were never asked to delay the show.

Allen said Monday that a representative with the band was asked three times to delay the show.

Reports released last week after months of investigation faulted the fair for the lack of clear safety protocols and confusion over who was in charge. Reports also said the stage design was grossly inadequate.

Victims and survivors' families who are seeking millions of dollars in damages have filed lawsuits against various entities involved in the show. Determining who was responsible for the decision not to delay the concert could be a key factor in the outcome of those lawsuits.

The fair's executive director, Cindy Hoye, said in a deposition in February that she asked Eric Milby, a representative for a concert promotion company, to seek a delay. According to a report released last week by Witt Associates, which was hired by the state to examine the decisions made on Aug. 13, Milby and tour manager Rollens discussed putting off the show, but Rollens said the band wanted to go on and was willing to play in the rain.



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