Troy Landry of Swamp People to visit Oklahoma City

by Ed Godfrey Modified: October 29, 2013 at 8:15 pm •  Published: October 27, 2013
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Troy Landry makes his living fishing for crawfish nine months out of the year and alligators for one.

During alligator season in September, a television cameraman follows Landry, who just finished filming the fifth season of the History Channel's “Swamp People.”

It's a television show that changed his life.

“Now, everywhere I go most people recognize me,” Landry said. “It's hard to get work done, but it's all for the good. People love us, my boys and I.”

The alligator hunter from Pierre Part, La., and one of the stars of “Swamp People” will be in Oklahoma City on Saturday.

He will be signing autographs at O'Connor's Lawn and Garden store near Quail Springs Mall between noon and 4 p.m.

Landry says he makes about 150 such appearances each year to meet fans of the show, which he thinks might be nearing its end.

“I am going to do it as long as it lasts,” Landry said with his thick, Cajun drawl . “I think if we are lucky, we might have a couple of years left.

“I think we have seen our better days to be honest with you, but this year I think we have got some of the best footage we ever have. We caught some real big ones.”

When the producers of “Swamp People” arrived in Louisiana looking to film a reality series about alligator hunters, state wildlife officials suggested Landry, who has spent his life in the swamp hunting gators.

Landry said he was probably only 3 or 4 years old when he started accompanying his father on alligator hunts.

Today, Landry and one of his sons share more than 500 alligator tags each season. Landry has caught as many as 82 in a day and only felt a gator's teeth once.

“I have been bit once in the foot by a small one, not a real big one,” he said. “I have probably four or five close calls from some big ones.”

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by Ed Godfrey
Reporter Sr.
Ed Godfrey was born in Muskogee and raised in Stigler. He has worked at The Oklahoman for 25 years. During that time, he has worked a myriad of beats for The Oklahoman including both the federal and county courthouse in Oklahoma City for more...
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