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Tuesday's Sports In Brief

Published on NewsOK Modified: May 22, 2013 at 2:28 am •  Published: May 22, 2013
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The magistrate ruled that Carl Pistorius, 28, was not negligent and that Maria Barnard, 32, was driving her motorcycle excessively fast when she crashed into the back of his vehicle in March 2008.

Carl Pistorius' case was brought to court shortly after his brother shot and killed his model girlfriend Reeva Steenkamp on Valentine's Day — a shooting he says was accidental because he mistook her for a burglar. He is awaiting trial.

Barnard died in a hospital six days after the accident.

BASEBALL

MONTREAL (AP) — A stretch of road in front of the stadium where he began his Hall of Fame career has been renamed in honor of former Montreal Expos catcher Gary Carter.

Signs indicating Rue Gary-Carter were already in place as municipal officials announced the renaming of Faillon Street West outside of what used to be Jarry Park after the most popular player in the history of the defunct National League baseball club.

A larger celebration is planned for June 15 when Ahuntsic baseball park in the city's north end will be named for Carter, who died last year of brain cancer at 57.

A section of Faillon street runs in front of the stadium the Expos called home from 1969-76.

GOLF

Golf's two governing bodies outlawed the anchored putting stroke used by four of the last six major champions, approving a new rule that starts in 2016 and urging the PGA Tour to follow along so the 600-year-old sport is still played under one set of rules.

The Royal & Ancient Golf Club and the U.S. Golf Association adopted Rule 14-1b, which prohibits players from anchoring a club against their bodies.

The decision Tuesday ends six months of sometimes rancorous debate. The rule was opposed by the PGA Tour and the PGA of America, which contended the stroke commonly used for long putters was not hurting the game and there was no statistical proof that it was an advantage.

SPORTS BROADCASTING

NEW YORK (AP) — ESPN is cutting its workforce, the latest Disney division to reduce staff.

The company would not say how many jobs are being eliminated, but they include unfilled positions. ESPN has about 7,000 employees worldwide, with about 4,000 at its headquarters in Bristol, Conn. The vast majority work behind the scenes.

ESPN has seen costs increase with skyrocketing prices for the broadcasting rights to live sports. For instance, the 12-year deal announced in November to televise the new college football playoff system will be worth about $470 million annually. The current four-year contract to air the Sugar, Orange and Fiesta bowls along with the BCS title game is worth about $125 million per year.