Tulsa supercomputer aimed at providing competitive advantage

A supercomputer that arrived at Tulsa's City Hall last week is expected to be online in May.
Published: March 19, 2013
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George Louthan, a computer scientist for the Tandy Supercomputing Center, said businesses have already approached the facility with possible supercomputing ideas, including an oil and gas company that wants help crunching data from seismic oil and gas exploration.

“For them to do one job on the servers they have, it takes them three months of constant processing to analyze the results,” he said. “For the same amount of financial investment in the supercomputer, it would take the same job roughly three weeks.”

Greer said the computer will have 102 nodes but has the potential to grow to 326. Businesses and other groups will be able to join the project by purchasing additional nodes at $10,000 apiece, along with a $2,500 yearly maintenance fee.

Members will always have access to their nodes, plus they'll be able to borrow nodes that aren't in active use to give their projects a massive boost in computational power at no additional cost.

ROBERT EVATT, Tulsa World